Laminate Flooring

Find Information on Laminate Flooring and Hardwood Flooring.

Hardwood Flooring Material

Hardwood Floor Buying Guide For First-time Homeowners

Hardwood is, perhaps, the best flooring choice you can pick in settings where water use is minimal. It's especially ideal for cold climes where tile and cork don't provide enough insulation.

Compared to other floor materials, hardwood is prized for its beauty, warmth and longevity. True, wood worms and termites can cause havoc but prevention is the prerogative of homeowners. Besides, every material has its drawbacks and hardwood comparatively does a lot better than the rest.

So now that you've decided you'd like to install hardwood floors, how do you go about selecting one? There are numerous species of hardwood and some won't be available where you are. Native hardwood is a good choice but if there's a scarcity then you'll only end up spending too much. To make shopping easier, here's what you should know when picking hardwood for floors.

Maple, oak, mahogany and cherry are a few popular types of hardwood. They're expensive, we know, but where look and durability are concerned few others come close. Let's see what they have to offer.

Maple: Though there are many varieties of maple, only a few grown in the US are commercially viable. What each have in common, however, is density. Maple is extremely hard so much so that it's frequently used as flooring in commercial and sporting centers like bowling alleys.

The evenly-sized pores produce a very fine grain that's subtle in beauty but noticeable enough to appreciate. Since there are so many species with each having distinct color variations and grains, you can mix maple furniture to maple floors which isn't too expensive.

Oak: Oak is a bit expensive but highly prized. It's also the most popular and commonly used species of hardwood. Dense, heavy, durable yet delicate in its appearance with its light color, it has prominent grains unlike maple.

Its unique texture which is a little coarse and its grains make it a favorite for Gothic-inspired and American and English country furniture aside from flooring.

Mahogany: Mahogany is noted for its warm, reddish-brown hue which is instantly recognizable. Also a hardy type of wood, it looks particularly good in modern and contemporary interiors when stained a brighter red. Like maple, you have the choice of several types of mahogany and patterns that range from ripple and mottle to striped and rope.

Cherry: Cherry also boasts a reddish brown color but is lighter than mahogany. The hue darkens over time to result in a rich, warm tone that's great for adding elegance to interiors. The grain patterns are tighter than with other types of wood and the natural properties of this beautiful material help it resist warping far better than others. It's also easier to carve and polish so you can have gleaming floors.

Rosewood: Rosewood is a deep reddish brown hardwood that also has tight grain patterns. It can be polished to a high sheen which only brings out the rich hue. A unique characteristic is its fragrance which continues to be released a long time after it's installed as flooring.

Like many hardwoods, rosewood is dense but easy to work with. It withstands quite a bit of wear and tear before it must be resanded and polished.

Hardwood flooring is prized for its beauty, warmth and longevity, however, there are multiple choices available and selecting the best one should be based on the requirement and its aptness. For an insight into the hardwood variants available, visit this website.

Original article published on amazines.com

Next page: Hardwood Flooring Showroom


Bookmark/Share This Page:

ADD TO DEL.ICIO.US ADD TO DIGG ADD TO FURL ADD TO NEWSVINE ADD TO NETSCAPE ADD TO REDDIT ADD TO STUMBLEUPON ADD TO TECHNORATI FAVORITES ADD TO SQUIDOO ADD TO WINDOWS LIVE ADD TO YAHOO MYWEB ADD TO ASK ADD TO GOOGLE ADD TO MAGNOLIA ADD TO NING ADD TO RAWSUGAR ADD TO SPURL ADD TO TAGTOOGA

  Bookmark and Share

Recommended Products

Wholesale Cork & Hardwood Flooring

www.eSaleRugs.com